Instructor Info:
Name: MARGOLIS, ERIC
Office Telephone: (604) 827-5021
Email: eric.margolis@ubc.ca
Taught Sections:
Status Section Activity Term Interval Days Start Time End Time Section Comments
 PHIL 101 001Web-Oriented Course1 Mon Wed12:0013:00

This course has mandatory discussion sections. Students must also register in one of the following sections: L01, L02, L03, L04, or L05. Please note: PHIL 101 and PHIL 102 are independent introductory courses and do not need to be taken in sequential order.

For more information about this course, including details regarding online course delivery, please visit Dr. Margolis' website: https://www.margolisphilosophy.com/phil101-blurb.html.


FullPHIL 101 003Web-Oriented Course2 Tue Thu16:0017:30

Please note: PHIL 101 and PHIL 102 are independent introductory courses and do not need to be taken in sequential order.

For more information about this course, including details regarding online course delivery, please visit Dr. Margolis' website: https://www.margolisphilosophy.com/phil101-blurb.html.

BlockedPHIL 455 001Seminar1 Mon15:0018:00

The Structure of the Mind: Do people with radically different background theories perceive the world in different ways? Is language essential to some forms of cognition? Are moral judgments more dependent on reason or emotion? This section of PHIL 455 will look at these and other high-level questions about the structure of the mind where the best research is equally grounded in developments in philosophy and cognitive sciences.

Prerequisites: PHIL 240 or COGS 200 if accompanied by 3 credits in PHIL at the 200-level or above, plus at least 3rd year undergraduate status. Recommended for this section: PHIL 451 (philosophy of mind) or PHIL 441 (philosophy of perception), and a general background in philosophy and/or cognitive science.

For more information about this course, including details regarding online course delivery, please visit Dr. Margolis' website: https://www.margolisphilosophy.com/phil455-topics-in-philosophy-and-cognitive-science.html.

 PHIL 551A 002Web-Oriented Course2 Wed14:0017:00

Permission is required to take this course for students who are not members of the Philosophy graduate program. Please e-mail Dr. Margolis for further information.

What underlies our ability to acquire the rich and varied concepts that structure how we think about the world? Do human conceptual capacities largely trace back to a powerful form of general intelligence? Or do they depend in part on innate special-purpose psychological systems for thinking in specific types of ways? This seminar will explore the latter (nativist) approach to the origins of concepts. We will discuss different interpretations of the nativist position and how it relates to debates about nature-nurture and debates about what it might mean to say that a trait is innate. We will also examine a surprisingly large number of arguments that factor into the case for a nativist approach, while taking up a variety of important case studies (for example, the origins of such concepts and ~

as 'belief,' 'cause,' and 'number').

COVID-19 notice: In the event that this course has to take place online, it will still be organized as a seminar with the usual focus on class discussion and student presentations, using Zoom or an equivalent video conference tool.