Instructor Info:
Name: GRIFFIN, MICHAEL
Office Telephone: (604) 822-4050
Email: michael.griffin@ubc.ca
Taught Sections:
Status Section Activity Term Interval Days Start Time End Time Section Comments
 CLST 211 001Lecture1 Mon Wed Fri13:0014:00

If this course is blocked for registration, it is because it is full. Please register in the Wait List section, and if and when a space becomes available, students will be automatically transferred "in order" from the wait list.

 CLST 211 WL1Waiting List1 Mon Wed Fri13:0014:00

Wait List for CLST 211-001. Students will be moved from the Wait List into the main course on a first come first served basis as spots open up.

 CLST 212 001Lecture2 Mon Wed Fri13:0014:00
 GREK 401C 001Seminar2 Mon Wed Fri9:0010:00

Plato and the Search for Happiness. An exploration of images of the human good life, and the role of philosophy in cultivating happiness and well-being in the works of Plato. Reading and analysis of the Apology, Socrates' defence speech including his account of his own life and philosophy; excerpts from Xenophon and Isocrates; and the Phaedrus, an essential source for Plato's theory of literature, cosmology, philosophy of love, and ethics. Students without GREK 351 can take both courses at the same time. Cross-listed with GREK 501C. Visit cnrs.ubc.ca for complete course description.

 GREK 501C 001Seminar2 Mon Wed Fri9:0010:00

Plato and the Search for Happiness. An exploration of images of the human good life, and the role of philosophy in cultivating happiness and well-being in the works of Plato. Reading and analysis of the Apology, Socrates' defence speech including his account of his own life and philosophy; excerpts from Xenophon and Isocrates; and the Phaedrus, an essential source for Plato's theory of literature, cosmology, philosophy of love, and ethics. Cross-listed with GREK 401C. Visit cnrs.ubc.ca for complete course description.

 PHIL 211 001Lecture1 Mon Wed Fri13:0014:00

This course is crosslisted with CLST 211. Students can register in either section. This course has no prerequisites.



Course Description: "The unexamined life is not worth living." This is how the seminal Athenian philosopher Socrates explained his way of life to the jury that sentenced him. How did this attitude (and with it the complex of Western philosophy, medicine, and science) first emerge in ancient Greece? In this course, we will piece together fragmentary evidence for the birth of rational speculation between the poets Homer and Hesiod (8th century BC) and Plato (5th-4th century BC). Through the origin story of Western philosophy, we will encounter the original articulations of Greece's most enduring and provocative ideas, among them atomism; materialism; the dialogue of science and religion; the notion of a universe governed by regular mathematical laws; the possibility of knowledge; and the g and ~

oals of human life. Focus: Socrates, Sophists, Plato, and Pre-Socratic philosophers. Reference to Aristotle.

This course has no prerequisites; beginners are welcome.

Equivalent: CLST 211

 PHIL 212 001Lecture2 Mon Wed Fri13:0014:00

This course is cross-listed with CLST 212. Students can register in either section.

Course Description: Is it possible to be sure that we are living a good human life, come what may? What would it be like to succeed at being a human being, at being ourselves? In the period under consideration in this course (c. 399 BCE-c. 529 CE), the nascent traditions of Greek logic, science, and ethics were turned to the exploration of such fundamental questions as these and spread across the Mediterranean world in the wake of Alexander the Great and the Roman Empire, laying the groundwork for the subsequent development of Western intellectual history. Over this term, we will study Aristotle, the great Hellenistic schools of ancient Athens (Stoics, Epicureans, and Skeptics), and the later ancient synthesis of Greek philosophy under the banner of Plato (Neoplatonism), and their influ and ~

ence on subsequent thought. Focus: Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans, Skeptics, and Neoplatonists (4th century BCE-3rd century CE).

This course has no prerequisites; beginners are welcome. Equivalent: CLST 212

 PHIL 510A 001Seminar1 Tue14:0017:00

This section will be held in BUCH D324

BlockedPHIL 585 003Directed Studies1
BlockedPHIL 585 009Directed Studies2