Instructor Info:
Name: LANTHIER, MICHAEL
Office Telephone:
Email: mlanthie@mail.ubc.ca
Taught Sections:
Status Section Activity Term Interval Days Start Time End Time Section Comments
FullHIST 220A 201Web-Oriented Course2 Mon Wed11:0012:00

HIST 220A will introduce students to the methods of historical practice, including primary-source analysis, historical writing, library and research skills, and public history. This course will involve a mix of synchronous and asynchronous remote teaching, including live tutorials on Fridays. Accommodations are possible for those unable to attend during scheduled class times.

FullHIST 220A L1CDiscussion2 Fri11:0012:00
FullHIST 220A L1DDiscussion2 Fri12:0013:00
FullHIST 220A L1EDiscussion2 Fri14:0015:00
 HIST 220A L1FDiscussion2 Fri13:0014:00
 HIST 220A L1GDiscussion2 Fri10:0011:00
FullHIST 220A L1HDiscussion2 Fri11:0012:00
 HIST 346 001Web-Oriented Course1 Mon Wed Fri9:0010:00

This survey examines the course of French history over the past 200 years. We will look at the political, social, economic and cultural developments of the period, which was filled with drama and tumult. France's modern history is unique in the Western world, with the country functioning as a political laboratory of sorts. Revolution followed revolution and the regimes were constantly changing: absolute monarchy, republic, empire, constitutional monarchy, republic (2nd time), empire (2nd time), republic (3rd time), proto-fascist dictatorship, and finally republic (numbers 4 and 5). These changes make France an exciting case study for anyone interested in fundamental questions regarding politics, democracy and the rights of the individual. Political upheaval went hand-in-hand with nu and ~

merous wars, from European conquest under Napoleon to brutal colonial struggles, all of which of course affected the course of events in the country. Although economic and social changes were not as dramatic, they are equally important in the long run, having helped to shape modern France as it exists today. The last thirty years, while superficially less dramatic than what preceded them, have seen France grapple with economic crises, the thorny issue of immigration and the country's incorporation into the European Union as it seeks a new role for itself in the 21st century. The examination of these developments will allow students to better appreciate and understand modern France as it exists today. The study of French history explains why modern France is, in many ways, different f and ~

rom its neighbours. Vive la différence!

This class will be taught in an asynchronous format.

Web-Oriented Course2 Mon Wed Fri9:0010:00

This survey examines the course of French history over the past 200 years. We will look at the political, social, economic and cultural developments of the period, which was filled with drama and tumult. France's modern history is unique in the Western world, with the country functioning as a political laboratory of sorts. Revolution followed revolution and the regimes were constantly changing: absolute monarchy, republic, empire, constitutional monarchy, republic (2nd time), empire (2nd time), republic (3rd time), proto-fascist dictatorship, and finally republic (numbers 4 and 5). These changes make France an exciting case study for anyone interested in fundamental questions regarding politics, democracy and the rights of the individual. Political upheaval went hand-in-hand with nu and ~

merous wars, from European conquest under Napoleon to brutal colonial struggles, all of which of course affected the course of events in the country. Although economic and social changes were not as dramatic, they are equally important in the long run, having helped to shape modern France as it exists today. The last thirty years, while superficially less dramatic than what preceded them, have seen France grapple with economic crises, the thorny issue of immigration and the country's incorporation into the European Union as it seeks a new role for itself in the 21st century. The examination of these developments will allow students to better appreciate and understand modern France as it exists today. The study of French history explains why modern France is, in many ways, different f and ~

rom its neighbours. Vive la différence!

This class will be taught in an asynchronous format.

 HIST 369 101Web-Oriented Course1 Wed16:0018:00

This class will be taught in an asynchronous format.

FullHIST 370 201Web-Oriented Course2 Mon Wed14:0015:00

HIST 370 will be entirely online and asynchronous. Students do not need to be available during listed class times to fully participate in the course.

FullHIST 370 L01Discussion2 Wed15:0016:00
 HIST 370 L02Discussion2 Fri10:0011:00
 HIST 370 L03Discussion2 Fri15:0016:00
FullHIST 370 L04Discussion2 Fri14:0015:00
FullHIST 403A 101Seminar1 Mon13:0015:00

This seminar will be held online. The Origins of the First World War: World War I was one the great turning points of world history: the bloody, brutal birth of the 20th century, it was a watershed moment that gave birth to an era of imperial collapse and total war. The war itself, as well as its causes and ramifications, continue to fascinate both professional and armchair historians. In this course, we will try to understand why the Great Powers of Europe went to war against each other in 1914. Over a hundred years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, this apparently simple question still cannot be answered in a completely satisfactory fashion. Scholarly disagreements over this question were once the result of patriotically-motivated attempts to blame one side or the and ~

other, but they are now indicative of deep divisions within academic history itself. Looking at primary sources, we will examine the diplomatic, military, economic, and social causes of the war that have often been pointed to. But we will also study a century's worth of historical interpretations to see what these tell us about the Great War and about the world it helped shape.