Instructor Info:
Name: KOROLEV, ALEXANDRE
Office Telephone: (604) 822-3292 ext. DEPT
Email: a.korolev@ubc.ca
Taught Sections:
Status Section Activity Term Interval Days Start Time End Time Section Comments
FullPHIL 120 001Lecture1 Mon Wed Fri14:0015:00

Course Description: This course is a basic introduction to logic and critical reasoning. It is designed to equip students with the tools and concepts needed to deal with both everyday and more technical arguments, as well as the skills to analyse and resolve everyday confusions, ambiguities, and fallacies. Topics covered include the distinction between logic and rhetoric; the analysis and resolution of ambiguities and fallacies; validity and inductive strength of arguments; elementary classical propositional and predicate logics; and term, multi-valued, and relevance logics. This course is not recommended for students with more than 90 credits.


FullPHIL 120 99ADistance EducationA

Course Description: This online Distance Education course is a basic introduction to logic and critical reasoning. It is designed to equip students with the tools and concepts needed to deal with both everyday and more technical arguments, as well as the skills to analyse and resolve everyday confusions, ambiguities, and fallacies. Topics covered include the distinction between logic and rhetoric; the analysis and resolution of ambiguities and fallacies; validity and inductive strength of arguments; elementary classical propositional and predicate logics; and term, modal, multi-valued, and relevance logics. This course is not recommended for students with more than 90 credits.


FullPHIL 120 99CDistance EducationC

Course Description: This online Distance Education course is a basic introduction to logic and critical reasoning. It is designed to equip students with the tools and concepts needed to deal with both everyday and more technical arguments, as well as the skills to analyse and resolve everyday confusions, ambiguities, and fallacies. Topics covered include the distinction between logic and rhetoric; the analysis and resolution of ambiguities and fallacies; validity and inductive strength of arguments; elementary classical propositional and predicate logics; and term, modal, multi-valued, and relevance logics. This course is not recommended for students with more than 90 credits.


FullPHIL 220 003Lecture1 Mon Wed Fri12:0013:00
 PHIL 220 004Lecture2 Mon Wed Fri9:0010:00

Course Description: This course is a basic introduction to contemporary formal logic and reasoning. No previous familiarity with either philosophy or logic is required, although previous exposure to an introductory course(s) in logic and critical thinking and/or scientific reasoning, Phil 120, or Phil 125, for example, would be an asset. You will learn how to symbolize and evaluate deductive arguments in sentential and predicate logic. Topics include natural language symbolization techniques; truth tables and interpretations; and systems of natural deduction up to relational predicate logic with identity. The course will be of interest not only to philosophy students, but to all students interested in sharpening their logical skills and exploring the nature of reasoning.

 PHIL 240 001Lecture1 Mon Wed Fri11:0012:00

Philosophy 240 is an introduction to epistemology (the study of knowledge) with the elements of metaphysics (the study of the nature of reality) as required for the clarification of the concept of knowledge. It introduces methods and tools of philosophical investigation through a cluster of questions about reality and our knowledge of it. The major questions considered include What is knowledge?, Can we know anything at all?, Are we rationally justified in having the beliefs that we have?, and What distinguishes knowledge from superstition, ideology and pseudoscience? The course will be of interest not only to philosophy students, but to all students interested in fundamental questions pertaining to the nature of knowledge and physical reality.

FullPHIL 321 001Lecture2 Mon Wed Fri13:0014:00

In this course we will examine two different approaches to the question of what it means to make choices rationally: decision theory and game theory.