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GPP 591D Special Topics in Public Policy - TOPS PUBLIC PLCY

Offerings respond to current policy debates, topics of emerging interest, availability of visiting scholars, and interest in non-traditional courses incorporating practitioner expertise, interest in particular disciplinary perspectives missing from core courses and electives, and interest in specific regions or countries.

This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

Credits: 3


Status Section Activity Term Interval Days Start Time End Time Comments
RestrictedGPP 591D 001Web-Oriented Course1 Tue Thu11:0014:00

Limited seating is open to non-MPPGA students. Please contact MPPGA at mppga.program@ubc.ca.

Please note that GPP 591D in Summer Term 1 starts one week late and extends into the exam period.

The course is titled Global China and World Order.

We are facing some devastating challenges to the world order we knew five years ago, the pandemic only one of them. For the past decade, the seminar on "Global China and World Order" has looked at how to understand China's expanding role in the world, the domestic forces beneath it, the shifts in the balance of power around it, its role in international institutions, and its interaction with key countries and regions.

The key questions we asked in every session were (a) how to understand what China thinks and wants, and (b) is China emerging as a responsible international actor and leader?

In these remarkable times and amidst an escalating controversy about how to judge Xi Jinping's China, we have the opportunity for a summer seminar that will focus on two issues that are of fundamental importance to China and the world--Climate Change and the Global Health and the COVID-19 Pandemic. We will be looking at both the domestic and international institutions involved as well as the issues themselves.

They aren't the full menu of important issues where what China does matters--think of military balances, territorial disputes, the international financial system, transformative technologies, trade and supply chains, peacekeeping, infrastructure development etc. But none are more central to understanding the crisis in global institutions and leadership that we now face.