Instructor Info:
Name: KOROLEV, ALEXANDRE
Office Telephone: (604) 822-3292 ext. DEPT
Email: a.korolev@ubc.ca
Taught Sections:
Status Section Activity Term Interval Days Start Time End Time Section Comments
  PHIL 120 002 Lecture 2 Mon Wed Fri 15:00 16:00

This course is not recommended for students with more than 90 credits.

The course is a basic introduction to logic and critical reasoning. It is designed to equip the students with the tools and concepts needed to deal with both everyday and more technical arguments, as well as the skills to analyse, and resolve, everyday confusions, ambiguities, and fallacies. Topics covered include the distinction between logic and rhetoric; the analysis and resolution of ambiguities and fallacies; validity and inductive strength of arguments; elementary classical propositional and predicate logics; term, multi-valued and relevance logics.

  PHIL 120 99A Distance Education A

This course is not recommended for students with more than 90 credits.

This online Distance Education course is a basic introduction to logic and critical reasoning. It is designed to equip the students with the tools and concepts needed to deal with both everyday and more technical arguments, as well as the skills to analyse, and resolve, everyday confusions, ambiguities, and fallacies. Topics covered include the distinction between logic and rhetoric; the analysis and resolution of ambiguities and fallacies; validity and inductive strength of arguments; elementary classical propositional and predicate logics; term, modal, multi-valued and relevance logics.


  PHIL 120 99C Distance Education C

This course is not recommended for students with more than 90 credits.

This online Distance Education course is a basic introduction to logic and critical reasoning. It is designed to equip the students with the tools and concepts needed to deal with both everyday and more technical arguments, as well as the skills to analyse, and resolve, everyday confusions, ambiguities, and fallacies. Topics covered include the distinction between logic and rhetoric; the analysis and resolution of ambiguities and fallacies; validity and inductive strength of arguments; elementary classical propositional and predicate logics; term, modal, multi-valued and relevance logics.


  PHIL 220 003 Lecture 1 Tue Thu 15:30 17:00

This course is a basic introduction to contemporary formal logic and reasoning. No previous familiarity with either logic or philosophy is required, although previous exposure to a critical reasoning course, PHIL 120, for example, would be an asset. You will learn how to symbolize and evaluate deductive arguments in sentential and predicate logic. Topics include natural language symbolization techniques; truth tables and interpretations; systems of natural deduction up to relational predicate logic with identity. The course will be of interest not only to philosophy students, but to all students interested in sharpening their logical skills and exploring the nature of reasoning.

  PHIL 320 001 Lecture 2 Mon Wed Fri 9:00 10:00

The two major topics of this course are computability theory and basic to intermediate metalogic. The first part elaborates what it means for a function to be computable employing two different approaches to computability: Turing machines and recursive functions. We demonstrate that these definitions of a computable function are equivalent: any function that counts as computable on one of the definitions also counts as computable on the other. This equivalence result provides some support for Churchs Thesis (the claim that all effectively computable functions are recursive functions). The second part develops some of the main ideas of basic to intermediate (meta)logic. Here, rather than doing proofs within a given system of predicate logic, our principal goal is to prove important factsand~

about our system of predicate logic itself. It includes the study of the systems syntax (the language and formation rules for formulas of predicate logic), semantics (the definition of valid (logically true) formulas in terms of interpretations), model theory (the notion of interpretations and models for sets of sentences and prove some important facts about models), proof theory (the definition of valid formulas in terms of deductions), as well as some other systems important properties (the soundness and completeness theorems, the undecidability of first-order predicate logic, the (downward) Lowenheim-Skolem theorem and the compactness theorem).