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PHIL 220 Symbolic Logic

Sentential and predicate logic. Translation from natural language; truth tables and interpretations; systems of natural deduction up to relational predicate logic with identity; alternative proof methods. Some sections may use computer-based materials and tests.

This course is eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading. To determine whether you can take this course for Credit/D/Fail grading, visit the Credit/D/Fail website. You must register in the course before you can select the Credit/D/Fail grading option.

Credits: 3


Status Section Activity Term Interval Days Start Time End Time Comments
  PHIL 220 001 Lecture 1 Mon Wed Fri 9:00 10:00
  PHIL 220 002 Lecture 1 Mon Wed Fri 15:00 16:00

An introduction to formal (sentential and predicate) logic. Students will learn to translate natural-language arguments into formal systems and evaluate their logical forms for validity. Emphasis on translation from natural language; truth tables and interpretations; proof systems up to relational predicate logic with identity. Also introductory metalogic, including proofs of soundness and completeness.

  PHIL 220 003 Lecture 1 Tue Thu 15:30 17:00

This course is a basic introduction to contemporary formal logic and reasoning. No previous familiarity with either logic or philosophy is required, although previous exposure to a critical reasoning course, PHIL 120, for example, would be an asset. You will learn how to symbolize and evaluate deductive arguments in sentential and predicate logic. Topics include natural language symbolization techniques; truth tables and interpretations; systems of natural deduction up to relational predicate logic with identity. The course will be of interest not only to philosophy students, but to all students interested in sharpening their logical skills and exploring the nature of reasoning.

  PHIL 220 004 Lecture 2 Mon Wed Fri 10:00 11:00

This course examines elements of deductive logic, which is primarily concerned with valid inferences. These ideas are introduced using a special language called FOL, containing names for objects and predicates of those objects. This gives rise to basic sentences, and we look at ways to connect them, forming more complex sentences. This yields propositional logic. We then develop a proof system. We end with a more complex version of FOL, based on quantifiers and variables, which gives a correspondingly more complex means of expression, and a more complex system of deduction.

  PHIL 220 005 Lecture 2 Mon Wed Fri 12:00 13:00

This course examines elements of deductive logic, which is primarily concerned with valid inferences. These ideas are introduced using a special language called FOL, containing names for objects and predicates of those objects. This gives rise to basic sentences, and we look at ways to connect them, forming more complex sentences. This yields propositional logic. We then develop a proof system. We end with a more complex version of FOL, based on quantifiers and variables, which gives a correspondingly more complex means of expression, and a more complex system of deduction.

  PHIL 220 99A Distance Education A
Full PHIL 220 99C Distance Education C

This section has a waitlist section: PHIL220 WLC.

Cancelled PHIL 220 WLC Waiting List C

This is a waitlist section for PHIL220 99C.